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Let’s Stick Together

For the song, see Let’s Stick Together (song).

Let’s Stick Together

Studio album by Bryan Ferry

Released
September 1976

Recorded
1973-76

Studio
AIR and Island Studios, London

Genre

R&B
glam rock

Length
38:45

Label
E.G. Records

Producer
Chris Thomas
Bryan Ferry

Bryan Ferry chronology

Another Time, Another Place
(1974)
Let’s Stick Together
(1976)
In Your Mind
(1977)

Professional ratings

Review scores

Source
Rating

AllMusic
link

Robert Christgau
(B) link

Let’s Stick Together is a 1976 album by Bryan Ferry. His third solo release, it was his first following the disbanding of Roxy Music earlier in the year. Unlike Ferry’s two previous solo recordings, Let’s Stick Together was not a dedicated album project, instead being made up of material released as singles, B-sides and an EP. It had a generally favourable critical reception, but only just made the UK Top 20.

Contents

1 Production
2 Critical reception
3 Track listing
4 Chart positions
5 Personnel
6 References
7 External links

Production[edit]
Five of the tracks on the album were remakes of Bryan Ferry songs previously recorded with Roxy Music. “Re-Make/Re-Model”, “2HB”, “Chance Meeting” and “Sea Breezes” were from the band’s eponymously titled debut album (1972), while “Casanova” was taken from Country Life (1974). In most cases the re-recordings were smoother and more oriented to jazz and R&B than the original Roxy Music versions.
The other six tracks on the album were covers. The sax-driven “Let’s Stick Together” was written and originally recorded by Wilbert Harrison. It was remixed in 1988 for the compilation The Ultimate Collection. Other up-tempo numbers were The Everly Brothers’ “The Price of Love” and Jimmy Reed’s “Shame, Shame, Shame” (which includes a counter-vocal by the backing singers which quotes Marvin Gaye’s “Can I Get A Witness”). The remaining covers, which included The Beatles’ “It’s Only Love”, were performed in a mellow cabaret style.
“2HB” (a tribute to Humphrey Bogart) had been released as the B-side of Ferry’s single “A Hard Rain’s a-Gonna Fall” in September 1973. “Chance Meeting” was the B-side of “The ‘In’ Crowd” in May 1974. “You Go to My Head” b/w “Re-Make/Re-Model” had been released as a single in June 1975, making #33 in the UK charts. “Let’s Stick Together” b/w “Sea Breezes” was released in June 1976, making #4. The Extended Play EP, featuring “The Price of Love” and “Shame, Shame, Shame” b/w “Heart on

CSNY 1974

CSNY 1974

Live album by Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young

Released
July 8, 2014

Recorded
August 14, 15, 19, 20, 21, 27, 28, 29, September 14, December 14, 1974

Genre
Rock, folk rock

Length
196:15 (full version)
78:16 (single disc sampler)

Label
Rhino Records

Producer
Graham Nash, Joel Bernstein

Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young chronology

CSN 2012
(2012)
CSNY 1974
(2014)

Professional ratings

Aggregate scores

Source
Rating

Metacritic
87/100[1]

Review scores

Source
Rating

Blurt Magazine
[2]

AllMusic
[3]

Rolling Stone
[4]

Drowned in Sound
(8/10)[5]

CSNY 1974 is the nineteenth album by Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, their seventh in the quartet configuration, and their fifth live album, the third as a foursome. Issued on Rhino Records in 2014, it consists of concert material recorded in 1974 on the band’s tour during the summer of that year. It was issued in several formats: a standard compact disc box set consisting of three audio discs and a standard DVD; as one pure audio Blu-ray disc and a Blu-ray DVD; and a more expensively packaged limited deluxe edition consisting of the material on six vinyl records along with the Blu-ray discs and a coffee table book. Two single disc samplers were also issued, one of the acoustic material exclusively available at Starbucks in the United States and Canada, and another at normal retail outlets. Each of the non-sampler sets also contained a 188-page booklet, and all formats were released the same day. The three-disc and DVD package peaked at #17 on the Billboard 200, while the Starbucks sampler peaked at #37 and the selections sampler at #81.[6]

Contents

1 Background
2 Tour
3 Production and box set content
4 Legacy
5 Track listing

5.1 Disc one
5.2 Disc two
5.3 Disc three
5.4 DVD
5.5 Single disc sampler
5.6 Starbucks sampler

6 Personnel

6.1 Production personnel
6.2 Tour personnel

7 Charts
8 Tour dates
9 Notes
10 References

10.1 Bibliography

Background[edit]
After the split of CSNY in the summer of 1970, through 1971 David Crosby, Graham Nash, and Neil Young released solo albums, while Stephen Stills issued two. All were gold records, as were the three issued in early 1972 by the quartet: Harvest; Graham Nash David Crosby; and Manassas; proving the group to be appealing commercially apart as well as together.[7] Indicative of this commercial clout, only the separated Beatles as a group also achieved gold records with regularity during the same time per

Spin Alternative Record Guide

Spin Alternative Record Guide

Author
Eric Weisbard and Craig Marks (editors)

Country
United States

Language
English

Subject
Alternative music, discography, music journalism, review

Published
1995 by Vintage Books

Media type
Print

Pages
468

ISBN
0-679-75574-8

Spin Alternative Record Guide is a musical reference book compiled by the American music magazine Spin and published in 1995 by Vintage Books. It was edited by rock critic Eric Weisbard and Craig Marks, who was the magazine’s editor-in-chief at the time. The book features essays and reviews from a number of prominent critics on albums, artists, and genres considered relevant to the alternative music movement. Contributors who were consulted for the book include Ann Powers, Rob Sheffield, Simon Reynolds, Michael Azerrad, and Robert Christgau.
When Spin Alternative Record Guide was published, it did not sell particularly well and received a mixed reaction from reviewers. The quality and relevance of the contributors’ writing were praised, while the editors’ concept and comprehensiveness of alternative music were seen as ill-defined. Nonetheless, it inspired a number of future music critics and helped revive the career of 1960s folk artist John Fahey, whose entry in the book helped renew interest in his music at the time of its publication.

Contents

1 Content and scope
2 Reception and impact
3 See also
4 References
5 Bibliography
6 External links

Content and scope[edit]

Music critics Robert Christgau (left) and Ann Powers (right) contributed to the book.

Spanning 468 pages, Spin Alternative Record Guide compiles essays by 64 music critics on recording artists and bands who either predated, were involved in, or developed from the alternative music movement. In the book, each artist’s entry is accompanied by their discography, with albums rated a score between one and ten.[1] The book’s editors, critic Eric Weisbard and Spin editor-in-chief Craig Marks, consulted journalists such as Simon Reynolds, Alex Ross, Charles Aaron, Michael Azerrad, Ann Powers, and Rob Sheffield, who wrote most of the complete discography reviews.[2] The artist entries are also accompanied by song lyrics and album artwork.[3]
Although “alternative” had been used as a catchall term for rock bands outside the mainstream, Spin Alternative Record Guide covers approximately 500 artists from a variety of genres considered relevant to alternative music’s development.[4] These include 1970s punk rock,

John Moat

John Moat (11 September 1936 – 16 September 2014) was a British poet, and co-founder, with John Fairfax, of the Arvon Foundation in 1968.
Moat died on 16 September 2014 and was survived by his wife Antoinette and their son and daughter.[1]
References[edit]

^ “John Moat – obituary”. Daily Telegraph. 23 September 2014. Retrieved 17 October 2014. 

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부산오피

Messia

Messia may refer to:

Pedro Messía de la Cerda, 2nd Marquis of Vega de Armijo (1700–1783); a Spanish naval officer
a harvesting goddess associated with Tutelina
Zana Messia (born 1987), a singer-songwriter from the Balkans
Agutazza Messia, an illiterate Sicilian woman (a quilt maker and domestic) from whom Giuseppe Pitre takes most of his tales, also in Italo Calvino’s folktales collection

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Messia.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

Beaconsfield Mine collapse

Location of Beaconsfield

The Beaconsfield Mine collapse occurred on 25 April 2006 in Beaconsfield, Tasmania, Australia. Of the seventeen people who were in the mine at the time, fourteen escaped immediately following the collapse, one was killed and the remaining two were found alive using a remote-controlled device. These two miners were rescued on 9 May 2006, two weeks after being trapped nearly a kilometre below the surface.

Contents

1 Mine collapse
2 Rescue effort
3 Reaction

3.1 Media interest

4 Telemovie
5 See also
6 References
7 Further reading
8 External links

Mine collapse[edit]
At 9:26 p.m. (Australian Eastern Standard Time) on 25 April 2006 a small earthquake triggered an underground rock fall at the Beaconsfield gold mine in northern Tasmania. Geoscience Australia said that the earthquake had a magnitude of 2.2, at a shallow depth at coordinates 41°11′24″S 146°50′24″E / 41.190°S 146.840°E / -41.190; 146.840.[1] Earlier speculation had suggested that mine blasting had caused the collapse.[2] Three of the miners working underground at the time were trapped,[3] and early reports suggested that 14 miners who were underground at the time had managed to scramble to safety. The mining company, Beaconsfield Mine Joint Venture, released a press statement saying they held “grave concerns for the three miners’ wellbeing”.[4]

Beaconsfield mine

Larry Knight (44), Brant Webb (37) and Todd Russell (34), were the three miners who remained unaccounted for. Knight had been killed in the initial rockfall, but Webb and Russell were still alive, trapped in part of the vehicle in which they had been working at the time of the collapse, known as a teleloader or telehandler. They were in a basket at the end of the telehandler’s arm, where they had been applying steel mesh to a barricade prior to backfilling a stope. It was initially misreported that the two miners were saved by a slab of rock that fell on top of the basket, but in a Channel 9 exclusive interview broadcast on 21 May, Webb and Russell stated that this was incorrect and that the “ceiling” above them was merely thousands of individual unstable rocks precariously packed together.
The cage was partially filled with rock, and the men were partially buried under some rubble. Webb seemed to have been knocked unconscious for a short time, and Russell’s lower body was completely buried.[5] When Webb awoke, the two were able to free themselves and each other from the fal

Glyndŵr

This article is about a district. For Welsh ruler, see Owain Glyndŵr.

This article does not cite any sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2009) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Coordinates: 52°59′46″N 3°23′35″W / 52.996°N 3.393°W / 52.996; -3.393

Glyndŵr

History

 • Created
1974

 • Abolished
1996

 • Succeeded by
Denbighshire, Powys, Wrexham

Status
District

 • HQ
Ruthin

Glyndŵr was one of six districts of Clwyd between 1974 and 1996.
It was formed on 1 April 1974, under the Local Government Act 1972, from parts of the administrative counties of Denbighshire and Merionethshire.
From Denbighshire came the boroughs of Denbigh, Llangollen and Ruthin, the rural districts of Ceiriog and Ruthin and the parishes of Llangollen Rural and Llantysilio, formerly in Wrexham Rural District. From Merionethshire came the Edeyrnion Rural District.
The district was named after Owain Glyndŵr, who lived in Glyndyfrdwy for a while.
On 1 April 1996 the district was dissolved, with parts going to each of the three principal areas of Denbighshire, Powys and Wrexham.

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Local government districts of Wales 1974–1996

Clwyd

Alyn and Deeside
Colwyn
Delyn
Glyndŵr
Rhuddlan
Wrexham Maelor

Dyfed

Carmarthen
Ceredigion
Dinefwr
Llanelli
Preseli Pembrokeshire
South Pembrokeshire

Gwent

Blaenau Gwent
Islwyn
Monmouth
Newport
Torfaen

Gwynedd

Aberconwy
Arfon
Dwyfor
Meirionnydd
Ynys Môn – Isle of Anglesey

Mid Glamorgan

Cynon Valley
Merthyr Tydfil
Ogwr
Rhondda
Rhymney Valley
Taff-Ely

Powys

Brecknock
Montgomeryshire
Radnorshire

South Glamorgan

Cardiff
Vale of Glamorgan

West Glamorgan

Lliw Valley
Neath
Port Talbot
Swansea

This article about a location in Wales is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Rajyotsava Prashasti

Rajyotsava Prashasti

Awarded by Government of Karnataka

Type
Civilian

Category
Literature, Music, Dance,
Theatre, Sculpture, Journalism, Sports,
Medicine, Education, Agriculture,
Information Technology and Science

Instituted
1966

First awarded
1966

Last awarded
2014

Award rank

← Karnataka Ratna

The Rajyotsava Awards, [1][2][3][4] the second highest civilian honor of the Karnataka state are conferred annually by the Karnataka Government on the occasion of the birth of Karnataka State on November 1 celebrated as Kannada Rajyotsava. The awards celebrate achievements by persons of eminence in their chosen fields. The awardees are from the fields of literature, music, dance, theatre, journalism, sports, medicine, education, agriculture, Information Technology and Science.[5] [6]
The awards are presented in Bangalore by the Chief minister of Karnataka. Each award carries an amount of Rs. 100,000, a shawl, a citation and a memento. In addition to that, the government allots commercial land for eligible awardees.[7]
Among the awardees are the likes of C. G. Somiah, S. R. Ramaswamy, Kris Gopalakrishnan, Ashwini Ponnappa, Pankaj Advani, Dr.H.Girijamma, Maya Rao[8] Mylswamy Annadurai, V. R. Gowrishankar[9] John Ebnezar[10] and C. D. Narasimhaiah.[11]

Contents

1 Award winners

1.1 2016 Awards
1.2 2015 Awards
1.3 2014 Awards
1.4 2013 Awards

2 References

Award winners[edit]
2016 Awards[edit]
Main article: Rajyotsava Awards (2016)
The Government of Karnataka announced 61 names for the year 2015 on the occasion of the 61th anniversary of the awards.[12]
2015 Awards[edit]
Main article: Rajyotsava Awards (2015)
The Government of Karnataka announced 60 names for the year 2015 on the occasion of the 60th anniversary of the awards.
2014 Awards[edit]
Main article: Rajyotsava Awards (2014)
The Government of Karnataka announced 59 names for the year 2014[13] on the occasion of the 59th anniversary of the awards. The awards were given away at the Ravindra Kalakshetra in Bangalore on 1st November 2014. The 2014 awards saw 1924 nominations[14] that were screened by a panel. Karnataka Chief Minister Siddaramiah announced that the government would bring out commemorative postal stamps of the 59 awardees.[15]
Prominent award winners for 2014 are: S. Janaki (playback singer), Justice M N Venkatachalaih (former Chief Justice of India), Dr. K. Kasturirangan (former ISRO head), Dr. B.N. Suresh (ISRO scientist), M. R. Poovamma (athlete),

George Kranz

This biography of a living person needs additional citations for verification. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living persons that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately, especially if potentially libelous or harmful. (October 2013) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

George Kranz

Born
15 December 1956
Germany

Website
[1]

George Kranz is a German dance music singer and percussionist. He is best known for his song “Trommeltanz”, otherwise known as “Din Daa Daa”. The song hit No. 1 on the Hot Dance Music/Club Play chart in 1984 and then returned to the chart in a new version in 1991, peaking at No. 8. “Din Daa Daa” (sometimes spelled “Din Da Da”) is considered a classic dance music track and has been remixed, sampled and bootlegged many times, including in 1987’s seminal “Pump Up the Volume” by MARRS, 1998’s Praise Joint Remix by Kirk Franklin, 2005’s “Shake” by the Ying Yang Twins, “Turn Around” by Flo Rida and an Xbox 360 commercial.

Contents

1 Discography

1.1 Albums
1.2 Singles
1.3 Producer
1.4 Filmography

2 See also
3 References

Discography[edit]
Albums[edit]

My Rhythm (1983), Pool
Magic Sticks (OST) (1986), Virgin
Move It (1989), SPV
Sticky Druisin (1995)
Very Best Of (1999), DFP-Music (BMG)

Singles[edit]

“Trommeltanz” (1983), Pool
“Bass Drum Ma Bass Drum” (1985), Pool
“Heya” (1987)
“Helmut Kohl Ist Tot” (1992)
“Din Daa Daa (91 Remix)” (1991), Cardiac
“Din Daa Daa (96 Remix)” (1996), DiN

Producer[edit]

The Fog – Metallic Lord (1999), DFP-Music (BMG)
Bunny Rugs – On Soul (2002), DFP-Music (H`art)

Filmography[edit]

“Breakin’2 Electric Boogaloo”
Kabine 18
Die Vier aus der Zwischenzeit (1. Staffel)
Tocata
Ein ungleiches Paar
Magic Sticks
Der Passagier – Welcome to Germany
Roy Black Story – Du bist nicht allein
Happy Birthday (Unschuldig schuldig)

See also[edit]

List of number-one dance hits (United States)
List of artists who reached number one on the US Dance chart

References[edit]

Official website
George Kranz at AllMusic

Authority control

WorldCat Identities
VIAF: 22341103
LCCN: n95018838
ISNI: 0000 0000 5516 5620
GND: 134433742
BNF: cb14025433d (data)
MusicBrainz: bd64de2c-517e-4202-bba0-a1b9263eede3

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This article about a German singer is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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This article on a house mus

Šišave

Šišave

Village

Country
 Serbia

District
Jablanica District

Municipality
Vlasotince

Population (2002)

 • Total
1,125

Time zone
CET (UTC+1)

 • Summer (DST)
CEST (UTC+2)

Šišave is a village in the municipality of Vlasotince, Serbia. According to the 2002 census, the village has a population of 1125 people.[1]
References[edit]

^ Popis stanovništva, domaćinstava i Stanova 2002. Knjiga 1: Nacionalna ili etnička pripadnost po naseljima. Republika Srbija, Republički zavod za statistiku Beograd 2003. ISBN 86-84433-00-9

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Municipality of Vlasotince

Capital: Vlasotince

Villages

Aleksine
Batulovce
Boljare
Borin Do
Brezovica
Crna Bara
Crnatovo
Dadince
Dobroviš
Donja Lomnica
Donja Lopušnja
Donje Gare
Donji Dejan
Donji Prisjan
Gložane
Gornja Lomnica
Gornja Lopušnja
Gornji Dejan
Gornji Orah
Gornji Prisjan
Gradište
Gunjetina
Jakovljevo
Jastrebac
Javorje
Komarica
Konopnica
Kozilo
Kruševica
Kukavica
Ladovica
Lipovica
Orašje
Ostrc
Prilepac
Pržojne
Ravna Gora
Ravni Del
Samarnica
Šišave
Skrapež
Sredor
Stajkovce
Stranjevo
Svođe
Tegošnica
Vlasotince
Zlatićevo

Landmarks

Giga’s House

Culture

“Wine Ball” manifestation

Notable people

Predrag Filipović, racewalker
Bogoljub Mitić, actor

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